FIVE HOURS FIVE MINUTES

  • 3 min read

FIVE HOURS FIVE MINUTES.
OBRA® CO-FOUNDER DAVE CORY REFLECTS ON THE TIME IT TAKES FOR WHAT IT'S WORTH.

Each Spring, I wonder if I’ll get THE call from my friends. Half wanting it, half no-way-in-hell, but it happens like clockwork. It’s time to climb and ride the steep chutes at Mt. Washington. The place where my heart palpitates every time. Mt. Washington is New Hampshire’s monster peak. For years, it's recorded the highest wind speeds in the world (230mph)! The winter conditions are brutal, but on this day the spring skiing and riding will be at its finest.

It all sounded good but I was stacked with all of OBRA’s current deadlines and mentally, was not ready to trudge vertical miles to climb and ride down steep mountain walls. It’s a physical beat down.

Conditions were lining up to be very good with warm blue skies and corn snow. So, after the call, I contemplated for ah…. 1/2 second. I thought moments like these help define my life and give me reason for being. I’m all in.

So, we set out. Up at 4:30am to drive 2 hours and meet at the car lot at the trail head. Since we were just entering spring, much of the snow melted on the lower half of the hike and was all exposed rocks. Also, I thought it would be a good time to test some OBRA’s that we have developed while we were making the trek. I was concerned once we reached the snow line but went for it. Thankfully there was a boot pack that led the way. They worked out great.


Mt. Washington is New Hampshire’s monster peak. For years, it's recorded the highest wind speeds in the world (230mph)!


Mount Washington

Miles to the base cabin, then another hike to the bottom of the amphitheater is Tuckerman’s Ravine. This place is scary, just by looking at it up close. You never quite allow yourself to get too comfortable. I think the scaling up the vertical icy walls can be the most nerve racking. Once up, you see beautiful New England for miles. After taking in the views, you head out of the snow fields and approach the headwall. This is where it gets serious as you don’t see anything in front of you except the earth falling off. At that point, there is no where to go but down this 50-55 degree face. It’s almost like you’re falling straight down but oddly, slightly in control, slightly. It’s exhilarating to say the least. The turns down the snow packed face light up every cell in me. Rarely have I felt this type of feeling. Then like that, it’s over. All of this is just for a few minutes of riding. Seems senseless.


Riding down Tuckerman’s Ravine represents a beacon for me. It’s a celebration when everything comes together in my life, as I have positioned it. Two years ago while plotting OBRA’s course, Arnaud, my longtime friend and co-founder, introduced to me the meaning of the Japanese philosophy of IKIGAI. The belief is that finding IKIGAI helps one make the choices in your life to live life to its fullest. Looking at what you love, am good at, what the world needs and what you can be paid for. Today, OBRA represents Arnaud and I finding our IKIGAI. We have met at this point in our lives where we make the choices that impact our future and our children's future. We can create a business with integrity that is based off of ethical and sustainable business practices. A life’s dream. OBRA is our reason for being and shredding this ravine celebrates these accomplishments.


Riding down Tuckerman’s Ravine represents a beacon for me. It’s a celebration when everything comes together in my life, as I have positioned it.


Left:Keeping a steady pace with about two hours to go. Right: Jeff Rawlins and Nathanael Asaro take in the view. The two men, @statusproject and @nathanaelasaro respectively, are amongst the highest quoted riders in the region.


Mount Washington

Top and bottom: Finally, after five hours of grueling ascent, Dave Cory, gets a go at one of his favorite and most rewarding snowboarding runs. It lasts all but more than five minutes.


Mount Washington

Mount Washington

Dave Cory, OBRA co-founders and the pair of OBRA Highs he wore all the way up Mount Washington.

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